Criminal Attorney Jevon Jaconi:

What you need to know about Theft

Attorney Jevon Jaconi Manitowoc County C

In Wisconsin theft crimes are charged based on the amount of assets stolen. Experienced Attorney Jevon Jaconi has many strategies to fight theft charges.


Punishment for theft in Wisconsin ranges from a misdemeanor to a felony. Additionally, criminal conviction can be followed with civil action to recover assets stolen.


If you or someone you care about is charged and convicted of theft, the financial consequences can be devastating. Furthermore, your reputation can be ruined as thieves are discriminated against by society.


With criminal conviction, civil suit becomes very easy to win by the allegedly damaged party. It is best to beat the criminal conviction to prevent civil actions.


Attorney Jevon Jaconi has the financial expertise to prevent a criminal charge for theft. Attorney Jaconi has additional resources to fight theft charges. Theft charges can be difficult to prove by prosecution, but they require an experienced attorney to fight these charges.


Most of the time theft charge require extensive accounting analysis by the prosecution. To beat these charges Attorney Jaconi knows many techniques to counter prosecution accounting and surrounding allegation analysis. 

What is theft [943.20]: 

In Wisconsin Theft is defined based on the following actions:

  1. Intentionally takes and carries away, uses, transfers, conceals, or retains possession of movable property of another without the other's consent and with intent to deprive the owner permanently of possession of such property.

  2. By virtue of his or her office, business or employment, or as trustee or bailee, having possession or custody of money or of a negotiable security, instrument, paper or other negotiable writing of another, intentionally uses, transfers, conceals, or retains possession of such money, security, instrument, paper or writing without the owner's consent, contrary to his or her authority, and with intent to convert to his or her own use or to the use of any other person except the owner. A refusal to deliver any money or a negotiable security, instrument, paper or other negotiable writing, which is in his or her possession or custody by virtue of his or her office, business or employment, or as trustee or bailee, upon demand of the person entitled to receive it, or as required by law, is prima facie evidence of an intent to convert to his or her own use within the meaning of this paragraph.

  3. Having a legal interest in movable property, intentionally and without consent, takes such property out of the possession of a pledgee or other person having a superior right of possession, with intent thereby to deprive the pledgee or other person permanently of the possession of such property.

  4. Obtains title to property of another person by intentionally deceiving the person with a false representation which is known to be false, made with intent to defraud, and which does defraud the person to whom it is made. “False representation" includes a promise made with intent not to perform it if it is a part of a false and fraudulent scheme.

  5. Intentionally fails to return any personal property which is in his or her possession or under his or her control by virtue of a written lease or written rental agreement after the lease or rental agreement has expired. This paragraph does not apply to a person who returns personal property, except a motor vehicle, which is in his or her possession or under his or her control by virtue of a written lease or written rental agreement, within 10 days after the lease or rental agreement expires.

Punishment for theft conviction [939.50]: 

  1. If the value of the property does not exceed $2,500, is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.

  2. If the value of the property exceeds $2,500 but does not exceed $5,000, is guilty of a Class I felony.

  3. If the value of the property exceeds $5,000 but does not exceed $10,000, is guilty of a Class H felony.

  4. If the value of the property exceeds $10,000 but does not exceed $100,000, is guilty of a Class G felony.

  5. If the value of the property exceeds $100,000, is guilty of a Class F felony.

  6. If any of the following circumstances exists, is guilty of a Class H felony:

    • The property is a domestic animal.

    • The property is taken from a building which has been destroyed or left unoccupied because of physical disaster, riot, bombing or the proximity of battle.

    • The property is taken after physical disaster, riot, bombing or the proximity of battle has necessitated its removal from a building.

    • The property is a firearm.

  7. The property is taken from a patient or resident of a facility or program under s. 940.295 (2) or from an individual at risk.

  8. If the property is taken from the person of another or from a corpse, is guilty of a Class G felony.

Penalty for Class A misdemeanor:

Fine: $10,000

Imprisonment: 9 months 

Or both

Penalty for Class F felony:

Fine: $25,000

Imprisonment: 12 years and 6 months

Or both

Penalty for Class G felony:

Fine: $25,000

Imprisonment: 10 years

Or both.
 

Penalty for Class H felony:

Fine: $10,000

Imprisonment: 6 years

Or both


Penalty for Class I felony:

Fine: $10,000

Imprisonment: 3 years and 6 months

Or both

Civil penalties:

Civil suits for theft require a much lower burden of proof by the damaged party. Therefore, it is imperative to prevent a criminal conviction.


Civil suits can be expensive, long, and complex. Without a criminal conviction, allegedly damaged party is discouraged to proceed with civil actions.


Attorney Jaconi knows strategies to beat both the criminal and civil actions. 

What you need to do right now:

It is best to prevent theft allegations from becoming a criminal charge at the law enforcement investigation stage. Attorney Jaconi has experience working with law enforcement to prevent theft allegations from becoming a criminal charge and possible conviction.

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